Skip to main content
 
image/svg+xml

Committees and Groups

Libraries Committees and Groups

Committee and Group Structure

The Emory Libraries use committees to:

  • Make recommendations on services, planning, or policy
  • Facilitate collaboration across libraries

This page provides information about and links to committees whose membership spans the libraries and their divisions.  Committees that are specific to a division or individual library may be included in the Libraries and Division section of the intranet.

There are four distinct types of committees and/or groups in Emory Libraries:

A committee is defined as a group that:
  • Provides oversight or approval for a service, long-term project, or process
  • Recommends and reviews policy when necessary Impacts all libraries and departments
  • Has membership that is appointed by Libraries Cabinet for a termed appointment
A committee should perform the following actions as part of its working structure:
  • Maintain bylaws, guidelines, or a charter, including how sub-committees report into the larger committee
  • Document action, including approvals and policies
  • Maintain a virtual presence on the intranet
  • Meet and communicate regularly amongst the membership
  • Report to Libraries Cabinet at least once per fiscal year
  • Report to All-Staff Meetings when applicable
All committees must have a Libraries Cabinet sponsor.
A task force is defined as a group that:
  • Comprises experts in a specified area, problem, task, or project
  • Has a clear and focused charter with a defined timeline for the task force
  • Identifies specific outcomes for the group
  • Has membership that is appointed by Libraries Cabinet
A task force should perform the following actions as part of their working structure:
  • Communicate progress and outcomes throughout the life of the task force
  • Report to Cabinet at least once per fiscal year or more depending on the timeline identified in the charter
  • Report to All-Staff Meetings when applicable
All task forces must have a Libraries Cabinet sponsor.
A community of practice is defined as a group that:
  • Comprises experts in a specified area or individuals seeking to share or learn about a particular service or topic
  • Meets less regularly than committees and task forces
  • May share information in informal ways
All communities of practice must have a Libraries Cabinet sponsor.
  • Provide input to the libraries or its divisions
  • Advise the libraries on decisions, policies, etc.
  • Sponsored by a member of the Cabinet

Committee and Group Sponsors

All committees and groups are assigned a sponsor upon creation; sponsors are pulled from the membership of Libraries Cabinet. The sponsor:

  • Meets regularly with chairs of the committees or groups
  • Is part of the requisite documentation storage (box folder, committee page, etc.)
  • Works with the committee to determine when to share beyond the group (informational, recommendations, etc.).
  • Works with committee when funding requests are needed.